NEWS
Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds
POSTED 17 May 2019 . BY Jane Kitchen
People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study.

The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients. The results were published in Cell Metabolism.

This small-scale study of 20 adult volunteers, conducted by researchers at the NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), is the first randomized controlled trial examining the effects of ultra-processed foods as defined by the NOVA classification system. This system considers foods "ultra-processed" if they have ingredients predominantly found in industrial food manufacturing, such as hydrogenated oils, high-fructose corn syrup, flavoring agents, and emulsifiers.

Previous observational studies looking at large groups of people had shown associations between diets high in processed foods and health problems. But, because none of the past studies randomly assigned people to eat specific foods and then measured the results, scientists could not say for sure whether the processed foods were a problem on their own, or whether people eating them had health problems for other reasons, such as a lack of access to fresh foods.

"Though we examined a small group, results from this tightly controlled experiment showed a clear and consistent difference between the two diets," said Kevin D. Hall, Ph.D., an NIDDK senior investigator and the study's lead author. "This is the first study to demonstrate causality – that ultra-processed foods cause people to eat too many calories and gain weight."

For the study, researchers admitted 20 healthy adult volunteers, 10 male and 10 female, to the NIH Clinical Center for one continuous month and, in random order for two weeks on each diet, provided them with meals made up of ultra-processed foods or meals of minimally processed foods. For example, an ultra-processed breakfast might consist of a bagel with cream cheese and turkey bacon, while the unprocessed breakfast was oatmeal with bananas, walnuts, and skim milk.

The ultra-processed and unprocessed meals had the same amount of calories, sugars, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates, and participants could eat as much or as little as they wanted.

On the ultra-processed diet, people ate about 500 calories more per day than they did on the unprocessed diet. They also ate faster on the ultra-processed diet and gained weight, whereas they lost weight on the unprocessed diet. Participants, on average, gained 0.9 kilograms, or 2 pounds, while they were on the ultra-processed diet and lost an equivalent amount on the unprocessed diet.

"We need to figure out what specific aspect of the ultra-processed foods affected people's eating behaviour and led them to gain weight," Hall said. "The next step is to design similar studies with a reformulated ultra-processed diet to see if the changes can make the diet effect on calorie intake and body weight disappear."

For example, slight differences in protein levels between the ultra-processed and unprocessed diets in this study could potentially explain as much as half the difference in calorie intake.

"Over time, extra calories add up, and that extra weight can lead to serious health conditions," said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. "Research like this is an important part of understanding the role of nutrition in health and may also help people identify foods that are both nutritious and accessible – helping people stay healthy for the long term."

While the study reinforces the benefits of unprocessed foods, researchers note that ultra-processed foods can be difficult to restrict. "We have to be mindful that it takes more time and more money to prepare less-processed foods," Hall said. "Just telling people to eat healthier may not be effective for some people without improved access to healthy foods."
 


CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2019

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
Spa Opportunities: - Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds...
Sign up for FREE ezine
Spa Jobs spa Industry News spa training spa oppportunities magazine spa opportunities blog spa-kit.net spa industry products Submit your news Advertise on Spa Opportunities Contact us at Leisure Media Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook

Jobs Search





joblink

Latest operator jobs
Urban Retreat
Strip Wax Bar & Boutique
111 Skin
To advertise call
+44 (0)1462 431385


diarydates

  Powered by leisurediary.com
03 Sep 2019
Spa Business Bootcamp Course
Laico Hotels & Resorts Regency, Nairobi, Kenya
05 Sep 2019
Spa Business Bootcamp Course
Sarova Whitesands Beach Resort & Spa, Mombasa, Kenya

spa-kit
suppliers news


Ishga phases out plastic packaging for eco-friendly alternative

Ishga, a luxury skincare brand specialising in organic seaweed products, has announced plans to completely phase out its plastic packaging, replacing it with sustainable alternatives.

beauty-kit


Knesko masks tap into gemstone energy
Skincare brand Knesko has launched two hydrogel collagen masks to combat environmental damage to the skin using semi-precious gemstones as active ingredients.


 
latest spa jobs
Spa Sales and Reservationist
The Bulgari Hotel London
Salary: Competitive Salary & Benefits
Job location: London, UK More>>
 


Therapist
Strip Wax Bar & Boutique
Salary: Competitive Salary and Benefits
Job location: London, UK More>>
 


Spa Therapist
The Bulgari Hotel London
Salary: Competitive Salary & Benefits
Job location: London, UK More>>
 


Spa Therapist

GLL

Salary: Up to £18,305 per annum
Job location:
Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK More>>
Therapists

Coworth Park

Salary: Up to £24,000 + commission
Job location:
Ascot, UK More>>
Facialist

GLL

Salary: Up to £12.24 per hour (including annual leave)
Job location:
Chelsea, London, UK More>>
Spa Therapist

GLL

Salary: Up to £12.24 per hour (including annual leave)
Job location:
Chelsea, London, UK More>>
Treatment Trainer

111 Skin

Salary: Competitive
Job location:
London, UK More>>
Massage Therapist

No1 Lounges Ltd

Salary: Competitive
Job location:
London Borough of Hillingdon, UK More>>
Spa Therapist

No1 Lounges Ltd

Salary: £24,000 - £25,500 pa
Job location:
London, UK More>>

Jobs page: 1


 
latest spa news

17 May 2019

Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds

BY Jane Kitchen

Participants, on average, gained 0.9 kilograms, or 2 pounds, while they were on the ultra-processed diet and lost an equivalent amount on the unprocessed diet
photo: shutterstock/182011403

People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study.


The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients. The results were published in Cell Metabolism.

This small-scale study of 20 adult volunteers, conducted by researchers at the NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), is the first randomized controlled trial examining the effects of ultra-processed foods as defined by the NOVA classification system. This system considers foods "ultra-processed" if they have ingredients predominantly found in industrial food manufacturing, such as hydrogenated oils, high-fructose corn syrup, flavoring agents, and emulsifiers.

Previous observational studies looking at large groups of people had shown associations between diets high in processed foods and health problems. But, because none of the past studies randomly assigned people to eat specific foods and then measured the results, scientists could not say for sure whether the processed foods were a problem on their own, or whether people eating them had health problems for other reasons, such as a lack of access to fresh foods.

"Though we examined a small group, results from this tightly controlled experiment showed a clear and consistent difference between the two diets," said Kevin D. Hall, Ph.D., an NIDDK senior investigator and the study's lead author. "This is the first study to demonstrate causality – that ultra-processed foods cause people to eat too many calories and gain weight."

For the study, researchers admitted 20 healthy adult volunteers, 10 male and 10 female, to the NIH Clinical Center for one continuous month and, in random order for two weeks on each diet, provided them with meals made up of ultra-processed foods or meals of minimally processed foods. For example, an ultra-processed breakfast might consist of a bagel with cream cheese and turkey bacon, while the unprocessed breakfast was oatmeal with bananas, walnuts, and skim milk.

The ultra-processed and unprocessed meals had the same amount of calories, sugars, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates, and participants could eat as much or as little as they wanted.

On the ultra-processed diet, people ate about 500 calories more per day than they did on the unprocessed diet. They also ate faster on the ultra-processed diet and gained weight, whereas they lost weight on the unprocessed diet. Participants, on average, gained 0.9 kilograms, or 2 pounds, while they were on the ultra-processed diet and lost an equivalent amount on the unprocessed diet.

"We need to figure out what specific aspect of the ultra-processed foods affected people's eating behaviour and led them to gain weight," Hall said. "The next step is to design similar studies with a reformulated ultra-processed diet to see if the changes can make the diet effect on calorie intake and body weight disappear."

For example, slight differences in protein levels between the ultra-processed and unprocessed diets in this study could potentially explain as much as half the difference in calorie intake.

"Over time, extra calories add up, and that extra weight can lead to serious health conditions," said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. "Research like this is an important part of understanding the role of nutrition in health and may also help people identify foods that are both nutritious and accessible – helping people stay healthy for the long term."

While the study reinforces the benefits of unprocessed foods, researchers note that ultra-processed foods can be difficult to restrict. "We have to be mindful that it takes more time and more money to prepare less-processed foods," Hall said. "Just telling people to eat healthier may not be effective for some people without improved access to healthy foods."



Connect with
Spa Opportunities
Magazine:
View latest issue
Sign up:
Instant Alerts/zines

Print edition
 

The Spa at Windsor Court to undergo major renovation
Four Seasons to open resort in Los Cabos with Oasis Spa
Emma Darby named COO of Resense
ISPA research: More men visiting spas than ever before
Global Wellness Summit relocates from Hong Kong to Singapore
Healing Holidays opens Singapore office
 
Catalogue gallery



Featured supplier




Invest in your employees – and your company – with FH Joanneum’s MBA in spa management

The FH Joanneum University of Applied Sciences offers a unique MBA programme in International Hospitality and Spa Management, and for the first time, is offering substantial financial grants for students who begin the course this year.


Company profile



Amac offer fully-accredited training courses which are recognised nationally by employers. Fitness education is our area of expertise and the quality of our teaching remains unrivalled by any other provider.
View full profile>>

spa directory

Spa design & concept

Spa equipment and treatment products

Skincare

Linen

Spa and beauty equipment

Skincare

Spa & beauty infrared treatment beds

Spa ceramics

Saunas, steamrooms and spas

Accessories

Skincare



Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd